Past Seminars

Here is the list of our past seminars :


Volker Bormuth (LJP, UPMC). ENS-ESPCI Biophysics Seminar - Volker Bormuth (LJP, UPMC).

Friday 31 March 2017 13:00-14:00 - ENS, Room L374/L376, 3rd floor

Whole-brain imaging during vestibular stimulation in zebrafish with a novel rotatable light-sheet microscope

Light-sheet microscopy allows cell resolved whole-brain calcium imaging at several brain scans per second in zebrafish larvae. Currently this technique is not compatible with dynamic stimulation of the vestibular system. We developed an ultra-stable miniaturized light-sheet microscope that can be rotated while performing whole-brain recordings. Rotating the microscope rotates the fish and stimulates the vestibular system while imaging always the same plane in the brain. We demonstrate volumetric whole-brain neuronal activity recordings during vestibular stimulation. We mapped the brain activity with cellular resolution of the vestibule-ocular reflex (VOR) which drives compensatory eyes movements to maintain clear vision during body rotation. Our long-term goal is study with this system multisensory signal processing by the vertebrate brain by combining visual with vestibular stimuli.






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Volker Bormuth (LJP, UPMC). ENS-ESPCI Biophysics Seminar - Volker Bormuth (LJP, UPMC).

Friday 31 March 2017 13:00-14:00 - ENS, Room L374/L376, 3rd floor

Whole-brain imaging during vestibular stimulation in zebrafish with a novel rotatable light-sheet microscope

Light-sheet microscopy allows cell resolved whole-brain calcium imaging at several brain scans per second in zebrafish larvae. Currently this technique is not compatible with dynamic stimulation of the vestibular system. We developed an ultra-stable miniaturized light-sheet microscope that can be rotated while performing whole-brain recordings. Rotating the microscope rotates the fish and stimulates the vestibular system while imaging always the same plane in the brain. We demonstrate volumetric whole-brain neuronal activity recordings during vestibular stimulation. We mapped the brain activity with cellular resolution of the vestibule-ocular reflex (VOR) which drives compensatory eyes movements to maintain clear vision during body rotation. Our long-term goal is study with this system multisensory signal processing by the vertebrate brain by combining visual with vestibular stimuli.






Archives des anciens séminaires  (42)


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