Past Seminars

Here is the list of our past seminars :


Jean Baudry (LCMD, CBI, ESPCI). Biophysics seminar ENS-ESPCI. - Jean Baudry (LCMD, PECSA, ESPCI).

Friday 9 June 2017 13:00-14:00 - ENS, Room L374/376, 3rd floor

High throughput single cells phenotyping for immune response monitoring.

There have been significant recent advances in the development of single cell analysis tools. If these methods are creating new opportunities in biology, they are workable mostly for dead cells: characterization of complex function at the single cell level is still challenging.
In this seminar, I will present a simple microfluidic system, in which single-cells are compartmentalized in hundreds of thousands of 40 pL droplets and analyzed in a two-dimensional droplet array using a fluorescence relocation-based immunoassay. This allows us to perform classical bioassays, but at the single cell level.
We applied this method to characterized the response in mice immunized with Tetanus Toxoid, simultaneously analyzing the secretion rate and affinity of antibodies from over 0.5 million individual cells enriched from spleen and bone-marrow. This system is a powerful tool for immune monitoring, to screen for monoclonal antibodies, or to bring quantitative information for future models of the immune response.






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Jean Baudry (LCMD, CBI, ESPCI). Biophysics seminar ENS-ESPCI. - Jean Baudry (LCMD, PECSA, ESPCI).

Friday 9 June 2017 13:00-14:00 - ENS, Room L374/376, 3rd floor

High throughput single cells phenotyping for immune response monitoring.

There have been significant recent advances in the development of single cell analysis tools. If these methods are creating new opportunities in biology, they are workable mostly for dead cells: characterization of complex function at the single cell level is still challenging.
In this seminar, I will present a simple microfluidic system, in which single-cells are compartmentalized in hundreds of thousands of 40 pL droplets and analyzed in a two-dimensional droplet array using a fluorescence relocation-based immunoassay. This allows us to perform classical bioassays, but at the single cell level.
We applied this method to characterized the response in mice immunized with Tetanus Toxoid, simultaneously analyzing the secretion rate and affinity of antibodies from over 0.5 million individual cells enriched from spleen and bone-marrow. This system is a powerful tool for immune monitoring, to screen for monoclonal antibodies, or to bring quantitative information for future models of the immune response.






Archives des anciens séminaires  (102)

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